Tag Archives: Carnivore restaurant

Dawa, ox testicles and crocodile in Kenya

29 Nov

By Andrea McVeigh

Guinness goes with Irish stew; coffee goes with croissants and red wine goes with steak.  But what should you drink when you’re chowing down on crocodile, ostrich and ox testicles?  Dawa, as it turns out, the national cocktail of Kenya.

Vegetarians, look away now…

We were in the world-famous Carnivore restaurant in Kenya’s capital, Nairobi (there’s one in Johannesburg too).  Open since 1980, it’s renowned for its speciality meats – whole joints of lamb, pork, beef, ribs, sausages, chicken and kidneys roasted on traditional Masai swords over huge charcoal pits.

It’s a moveable feast, with waiters coming to your table to slice off morsels of whatever takes your fancy – they only stop when you finally admit defeat and lower the Carnivore flag on your table.  But despite the fleshy feast that it’s famous for, Carnivore does a pretty great vegetarian menu too.

Some might balk at the idea of crocodile, ox balls and ostrich, but it’s these exotic meats that tickle many tastebuds and prove to be the big draw.  It’s not a habit that’s exclusive to Africa either.  In north America, Rocky Mountain Oysters are bull calf testicles, usually deep-fried and served with a dipping sauce. In Spain, Argentina and some parts of Mexico, they’re given the slang name of huevos de toro (bull’s eggs).  But no such euphemisms exist at Carnivore, where they’re on the menu as plain old ox balls.

So what do ox testicles taste like?  They have a texture like pâté and taste just a little bit salty; exactly as you would expect, had you ever given the matter any thought.

As for the famous ‘tastes like chicken’ sobriquet, that rests with crocodile.  What does crocodile taste like?  A sort of fishy, almost citrussy, chicken-like meat actually.

A cold Kenyan Tusker beer goes down well with pretty much anything, but the speciality at Carnivore is the Dawa cocktail (its name translates as medicine or ‘magic potion’ in Swahili).  Based on the Brazilian Caipirinha and subsequently introduced into Kenya and adapted, it’s ‘Hakuna Matata’ (the Swahili phrase for ‘there are no worries’) in a glass.

Recipes vary slightly, in terms of measures and quantities, but they’re all based around the same ingredients.

DAWA COCKTAIL RECIPE:
vodka (one or two shots depending on how strong you like your cocktails)
two lime quarters unpeeled
a teaspoon of sugar
honey
crushed ice

Pour the vodka, honey and sugar into a whisky glass and add the lime quarters and crushed ice.  Use a muddler or honey stick to crush all the ingredients together really well.  The key is to mush the ingredients together as much as possible and swirl the mixture until the honey has blended well too.